Supplements

Supplements: If you have an adverse event, report it

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“Adverse events” are unfavorable or unusual reactions/effects/illnesses that can occur with the use of some dietary supplements, just as they can with over-the-counter and prescription medications. Examples of adverse events include anxiety, headaches, increased blood pressure, vision problems, and stroke. Such adverse events may be due to one supplement taken alone or to combinations of supplements or to interactions between drugs and supplements.… Continue Reading...

Is whey protein the way to go?

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Protein supports muscle growth and repair. People often turn to protein supplements (such as whey, casein, and soy) to optimize those effects, especially after a workout. However, whole foods, not dietary supplements, should be your first choice for protein. Whole-food protein sources such as lean meats, fish, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds are just as effective as (in some cases more effective than) protein supplements.… Continue Reading...

Is DMAA coming back?

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DMAA has been illegal for use as an ingredient in dietary supplements for more than 3 years. It still is, but just when you think it would be disappearing from the market, it seems to be on a slight rise again. Our online search of available dietary supplements with DMAA turned up 11 products we had never encountered before, in addition to 34 products still on the list since before DMAA became illegal.… Continue Reading...

Energy drinks: different labels, same risks

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Most energy drinks are now labeled with Nutrition Facts instead of Supplement Facts, but that doesn’t automatically make them safe. The most popular energy drinks contain about 80–120 mg of caffeine per serving (8 oz.)—about the same amount of caffeine in an 8-ounce coffee. Caffeine isn’t necessarily a bad thing. When used appropriately, caffeine can boost mental and physical performance.… Continue Reading...

Supplements: Can you spot a red flag?

Some dietary supplements on the market can contain unsafe ingredients and might even contain ingredients not listed on the label. If you are currently using or considering using a dietary supplement, ask yourself these questions to minimize your risk of consuming potentially harmful products.

Is it a high-risk dietary supplement? High-risk product categories include:
  • Bodybuilding
  • Weight loss
  • Sexual enhancement
  • Pain
  • Cognitive enhancement
Is the label missing a third-party certification/ verification label?
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Chilling out with relaxation drinks?

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If you’re feeling stressed, don’t rely on liquid relaxation products to relieve your tension. While energy drinks are promoted to give you an extra boost, relaxation drinks* are marketed to do just the opposite and help you, well, relax. These products commonly contain the amino acid theanine, as well as several different plant-based ingredients.… Continue Reading...

Why do some protein powders have Nutrition Facts labels while others have Supplement Facts labels?

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has specific definitions for conventional foods and dietary supplements, but protein powders can fall into one or the other. There are no definitive guidelines for protein powders, and a product’s category (and, thus, label) depends on how the manufacturer intends the product to be used.… Continue Reading...

Are testosterone booster dietary supplement products safe and effective?

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Testosterone booster dietary supplement products claim to increase the male sex hormone testosterone, which affects muscle strength, endurance, and male sexual performance. There is insufficient evidence to support the claims for the many “natural ingredients” on the market. These ingredients include Tribulus terrestris, Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali or Longjack), Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), fenugreek, Mucuna pruriens (cowhage), D-aspartic acid, Bulbine natalensis, Saw palmetto, Epimedium grandiflorum (horny goat weed), diindolylmethane (DIM), maca, and a wide range of botanical extracts, plant steroids, and flavones.… Continue Reading...

18 Health Benefits of Fish Oil, According to Science

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by Jen Miller

Many people speak highly of the benefits of fish oil supplementation. Fish oil contains a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids – the good fats that are necessary to help your body function properly.

Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency has ranked among the top ten leading causes of death in the United States.… Continue Reading...

10 Things To Know About Dietary Supplements for Children and Teens

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Nearly 12 percent of children (about one in nine) in the United States use a complementary health approach, such as dietary or herbal supplements. Some teens use products advertised as dietary supplements for weight loss or bodybuilding. Increasingly, products sold as dietary supplements, particularly for weight loss and bodybuilding, contain ingredients that could be harmful, including prescription drug ingredients and controlled substances.… Continue Reading...