Jabrill Peppers Tests Positive For Dilute Sample At Draft Combine

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Jabrill Peppers, his draft stock already in question, may have further clouded his NFL future.

The former Michigan linebacker/safety tested positive for a dilute sample at last month’s scouting combine, according to Adam Schefter.

NFL notified teams that Michigan’s Jabril Peppers tested positive for a dilute sample at the combine, league sources tell ESPN.

Text from front office executive on Jabrill Peppers and diluted sample: “Does he think we’re stupid?”

 A spokesman who works for the agency that represents Peppers responded to the report with the following statement, via Schefter:

“Peppers went to the combine. He was sick after flying there from San Diego. He has a history of cramping. Peppers was being pumped with fluids, drinking 8-10 bottles of water before he went to bed, because he was the first guy to work out two days for the LBs and DBs. He had to go through that first day, come back on second day, and that was the fear. So Peppers was pounding water and under the weather. He never failed a drug test in his life, nor tested positive before for any substance.”

Most experts believe Peppers will be a mid-to-late first round pick in the draft, which kicks off on Thursday night. But the positive drug test, if true, threatens to diminish his value.

Former Alabama linebacker Reuben Foster also returned a diluted sample at the scouting combine and stands to “slide down (draft) boards” as a result.

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2017/04/24/report-jabril-peppers-tests-positive-for-diluted-sample-at-draft-combine/

CHRIS OWINGS JOINS TAYLOR HOOTON FOUNDATION’S ADVISORY BOARD OF MAJOR-LEAGUE PLAYERS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

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CHRIS OWINGS JOINS TAYLOR HOOTON FOUNDATION’S ADVISORY BOARD OF MAJOR-LEAGUE PLAYERS

D-backs Inielder Joins 37 Others in Helping to Educate Young People About the Dangers of Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs

 

McKinney, Texas (Monday, April 24, 2017) – The Taylor Hooton Foundation announced today that Chris Owings of the Arizona Diamondbacks has joined its “Advisory Board” of active players from throughout Major League Baseball. The Taylor Hooton Foundation is widely acknowledged as the leader in the advocacy against appearance and performance enhancing drug use by the youth of America.

The D-backs infielder joins 37 other members of the Hooton Foundation’s “Advisory Board,” which now includes at least one player from 29 of the 30 major-league teams. The remaining team is working to secure a new member for the ’17 so that every MLB team will again be represented. Ownings replaces Brad Ziegler, who was a charter member of the “Advisory Board,” as the D-backs’ representative.

“It is so important that our young people have positive role models to look up to, especially when it comes to the topic of competing in sports and in life by doing things the right way,” said Taylor Hooton Foundation Founder and Executive Chair Don Hooton. “These major league athletes reached the pinnacle of their sport and, combined with our education campaign, are the most effective weapons we have in this national struggle. We are honored to have such a terrific group of major league players working with us.”

As members of the “Advisory Board” – formed in 2014 and fully endorsed by Major League Baseball – the players will participate in the THF’s 2017 public-service campaign, All Me. For the campaign, a print and video PSA featuring each of the Foundation’s “Advisory Board” members will be created – with images provided by THF national partner, Getty Images – and will be made available to each player’s respective team for its program/magazine and video boards for the ‘17 season. In addition, All-Me-themed print PSAs will run in Major League Baseball’s All-Star-Game, League-Championship-Series and World-Series programs.

In addition to their participation in the public-service-ad campaigns since 2015, members of the “Advisory Board” also take part in the THF’s educational activities in their local communities. Board members have also provided their input on the most-effective ways to educate North America’s young people about the dangers of anabolic steroids and other appearance and performance enhancing drugs.

To date, the Taylor Hooton Foundation has spoken to and educated more than one-million people. It has a Latin American outreach and travels throughout the Caribbean, speaking to thousands of RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities) athletes, coaches and parents in partnership with Major League Baseball. Additionally, the THF introduced a new eLearning program in 2014 – narrated by Bob Costas – to Little League Baseball that is offered to its one-million adult coaches and other volunteers.

Members of the Taylor Hooton Foundation’s “Advisory Board” – to date – include:

Elvis Andrus (Texas Rangers)

Jake Arrieta (Chicago Cubs)

Jose Bautista (Toronto Blue Jays)

Charlie Blackmon (Colorado Rockies)

Michael Blazek (Milwaukee Brewers)

Jay Bruce (New York Mets)

Matt Carpenter (St. Louis Cardinals)

Brian Dozier (Minnesota Twins)

Matt Duffy (Tampa Bay Rays)

Adam Duvall (Cincinnati Reds)

Logan Forsythe (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Brett Gardner (New York Yankees)

Dillon Gee (Texas Rangers)

Ken Giles (Houston Astros)

Alex Gordon (Kansas City Royals)

J. J. Hardy (Baltimore Orioles)

Derek Holland (Chicago White Sox)

Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Dallas Keuchel (Houston Astros)

Jason Kipnis (Cleveland Indians)

Nick Markakis (Atlanta Braves)

James McCann (Detroit Tigers)

Mark Melancon (San Francisco Giants)

Aaron Nola (Philadelphia Phillies)

Chris Owings (Arizona Diamondbacks)

Joe Panik (San Francisco Giants)

Dustin Pedroia (Boston Red Sox)

Josh Reddick (Houston Astros)

Anthony Rendon (Washington Nationals)

Clayton Richard (San Diego Padres)

Tyson Ross (Texas Rangers)

Chris Sale (Boston Red Sox)

Marcus Semien (Oakland Athletics)

Matt Shoemaker (Los Angeles Angels)

Neil Walker (New York Mets)

Christian Yelich (Miami Marlins)

Brad Ziegler (Miami Marlins)

Mike Zunino (Seattle Mariners)

 

CONTACT:    Rick Cerrone / Rick Cerrone Communications

(914) 715-5491 / rick@rickcerrone.com

 About The Taylor Hooton Foundation: The Taylor Hooton Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit organization that is dedicated to educating North America’s young people about the dangers of anabolic steroids and other appearance and performance enhancing drugs.   The friends and family of Taylor Hooton formed the Foundation in 2004 after his untimely death at 17 years old following his use of anabolic steroids.

For more information about the Taylor Hooton Foundation and its efforts, please visit www.taylorhooton.org and www.allmeleague.com.

Performance enhancing drugs: a quiet epidemic

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Dick Butkus, a Hall of Fame linebacker for the Chicago Bears, lives in Malibu, Calif., where he raises money to fight steroid abuse in high schools.

For weeks news of Allonzo Trier’s run-in with performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) dominated the collegiate sports headlines and occupied commentators around the country.

From college basketball to the Tour de France, PEDs pop up no matter what sport you follow.  The Mayo Clinic estimates that 1 in 20 teenagers uses steroids to aid muscle growth.

But when penalties range from temporary suspension to being removed from future competition and stripped of awards, it would be fair to ask why doping is worth it.

The answer can be broken down into two areas: First, the benefits that athletes can gain from PEDs outweigh the risks in their mind. Second, the supplement market is so poorly monitored that access is very easy.

Dr. Farshad “Mazda” Shirazi, emergency medicine associate professor and medical director of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center, explained; “the supplement market is not regulated and is over the counter so what you buy could be tainted with performance-enhancing drugs.”

Pharmaceutical companies can get away with including trace amounts of performance enhancing drugs because they are not federally regulated and it boosts the company’s image that their product works better than the competitors—even if for an illicit reason. If you buy protein powder that is laced with a performance enhancing drug such as anabolic steroids, you would see much better results than with that of a protein that is clean of PEDs.

Because the supplement market is not federally regulated, it is up to the public to demand the regulation of supplements to maintain the integrity of our athletes’ performances and everyday fitness needs.

Despite the high profile of the Trier episode, PEDs are usually not a huge issue within collegiate sports. In fact, they are more challenging with high school athletes. While governmental regulations may be lax, universities often issue strict regulations and consequences for athletes who consume PEDs. This is why universities frequently have teams of sports nutritionists to make sure that all supplements are not tainted in any shape or form.

Shirazi noted with high school athletes there is a pressure to perform at an exceptional level to obtain scholarships to play at a university. But most high schools are not equipped with full sports nutrition staff and lack the background to properly educate their students on supplement use.

The Daily Wildcat attempted to contact four representatives of UA Athletics to learn how they deal with the issue of PEDs, but two refused comment and two did not return our messages.

It was not only administrators that refused to comment. UA athletes themselves are prohibited from discussing the motives or perspectives on PED use.

While PEDs can ruin careers and affect the integrity of a sports department, the potential health damage from long-term use of these largely unregulated substances cannot be overstated.

Although one-time use may not have many harmful effects, Shirazi explained “in men, anabolic steroids can cause skin changes such as zits and pimples, increase a male’s natural testosterone and can even affect the temperament of individuals. In women, it can cause them to grow hair and become increasingly more masculine.”

Students should wary of what supplements—such as protein powder, pre-workout formula and vitamins—they are ordering from Amazon, because without conducting their own laboratory testing, the only option is to trust the manufacturer’s word. However, given proper nutrition, hydration and multivitamins, most people can achieve their fitness goals without resorting to more unsound substances.

Remember, if it sounds too good to be true it probably is.

http://www.wildcat.arizona.edu/article/2017/02/performance-enhancing-drugs-a-quiet-epidemic

9 ways anabolic steroids are harmful to your body

steroids

A few months ago, we all saw a popular actor’s much-publicised ‘transformation’ video. At the beginning of the video, we see the pudgy and out-of-shape actor, who gained 28 kg for a role, transform into a bulky and fit form in a matter of six months. It was an incredible feat, and we’d be lying if we said we weren’t amazed!

Close on the heels of that video, a YouTuber named Ranveer Allahabadia who goes by the screen name Beer Biceps released a response video. In it, he speculated that such a drastic in such a short span of time is impossible without a little help from anabolic steroids. Although he applauded the actor for his hard work and discipline, he also said that these actors could mislead the youth into thinking that physical transformation is possible within a matter of months. Athletes and actors often supplement their workout routine with steroids. The lure of big muscles and enhanced performances often make them ignore the horrible side effects that come with them. Here are some of the devastating side effects of taking anabolic steroids. Read fitness expert Justin Woltering’s tips for insane muscle growth.

Changes in the shape of the heart
Steroids could cause you a change of heart, literally! Studies have proven that prolonged use of anabolic steroids can alter the structure of a person’s heart, which can mess with its contraction and relaxation functions. [1] Steroid usage can also possibly cause an increase in the heart’s size and trigger future heart failure. [2]
Liver diseases and cancer
Your liver is responsible for breaking down the steroids in your body. Continuously abusing oral anabolic steroids will surely put a lot of pressure on your liver and in no time it causes the organ to give in. [3] There are also cases of liver cancer developing due to steroids. This risk, however, is not seen with injectable steroids.
High blood pressure
Studies have also shown how anabolic steroid usage can cause high blood pressure or hypertension among athletes. [3] Your kidney functions could go for a toss causing sodium and water retention in the body. This puts pressure on the veins, causing high BP.

Shrinking of testicles
Your testicles are in charge of producing testosterone. When your brain senses that it is already being introduced into the body from outside (steroids is a type of testosterone), it signals the testes to stop producing it. The result is a shrunken and shrivelled pair of testicles. [4] Here are 8 symptoms of hypogonadism or shrunken testicles.

Oily skin and severe acne
You may think acne and oily skin are two of the less serious side effects of steroid use. But not acne fulminans! It is a serious form of acne that causes deep scarring and pitting of the facial skin. [5] If you take steroids for too long, the excess testosterone in your body causes your sebaceous glands to overproduce sebum.

Hair loss
One of the worst-kept secrets of the fitness world is the steroid-induced hair loss; which is why too many men in the industry are balding. Too much DHT (Dihydrotestosterone), a male hormone, spells doom for the hair follicles. [6]

Infertility
Your testicles are in charge of producing testosterone. When your brain senses that it is already being introduced into the body from outside (steroids is a type of testosterone), it signals the testes to stop producing it. The result is a shrunken and shrivelled pair of testicles. [4]

Cholesterol and blood lipids
Steroid usage causes a big change in the lipid profile of your blood thanks to the meddling effects of DHT. It also messes with the production of good cholesterol HDL which is responsible for removing the bad cholesterol from the body. [8]

Breast growth in men
Probably one of the most embarrassing side effects of anabolic steroid usage in men is the growth of breasts. Anabolic steroids tend to throw off your hormonal balance, causing oestrogen to dominate testosterone, causing enlargement of breasts in men. [9]

Some of these side effects are reversible, but some aren’t. Others can be potentially life threatening. These are some of the reasons why more and more people in the fitness industry are making an informed choice and staying away from steroids. Read about the tried-and-tested old school tips to bulk up.

References:
[1] Sullivan, M. L., Martinez, C. M., Gennis, P., & Gallagher, E. J. (1998). The cardiac toxicity of anabolic steroids. Progress in cardiovascular diseases, 41(1), 1-15.
[2] Kennedy, M. C., & Lawrence, C. (1993). Anabolic steroid abuse and cardiac death. The Medical journal of Australia, 158(5), 346-348.
[3] Lenders, J. W. M., Demacker, P. N. M., Vos, J. A., Jansen, P. L. M., Hoitsma, A. J., Van’t Laar, A., & Thien, T. (1988). Deleterious effects of anabolic steroids on serum lipoproteins, blood pressure, and liver function in amateur body builders. International journal of sports medicine, 9(01), 19-23.
[4] Coward, R. M., Rajanahally, S., Kovac, J. R., Smith, R. P., Pastuszak, A. W., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2013). Anabolic steroid induced hypogonadism in young men. The Journal of urology, 190(6), 2200-2205.
[5] Heydenreich, G. (1989). Testosterone and anabolic steroids and acne fulminans. Archives of dermatology, 125(4), 571-572.
[6] de Souza, G. L., & Hallak, J. (2011). Anabolic steroids and male infertility: a comprehensive review. BJU international, 108(11), 1860-1865.
[7] Tosti, A., Misciali, C., Piraccini, B. M., Peluso, A. M., & Bardazzi, F. (1994). Drug-induced hair loss and hair growth. Drug Safety, 10(4), 310-317.
[8] Costill, D. L., Pearson, D. R., & Fink, W. J. (1984). Anabolic steroid use among athletes: Changes in HDL-C levels. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 12(6), 112-117.
[9] Carlson, H. E. (2015). Gynecomastia. In 2015 Meet-The-Professor: Endocrine Case Management (pp. 289-292). The Endocrine Society.

Supplements may cost people more than money

A 2015 research study found that 60 to 70 percent of active-duty members and 44 to 53 percent of Department of Defense civilians use at least one dietary supplement per week. The study also found that people who used one to two supplements per week were 1.5 times more likely to report abnormal heartbeats. People using three to four supplements were three times more likely to report abnormal heartbeats. (U.S. Air Force photo / Senior Airman Amber Carter)

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Would you take dietary supplements to run faster, build larger muscles and trim your waistline? Would the cost be worth that price?

Two Army soldiers formerly assigned in Europe learned the price they paid was not worth it. Both have been hospitalized with liver failure after using a German-made supplement purchased online, said Lt. Col. Heidi Clark, 60th Diagnostics and Therapeutics Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, California.

The product was advertised as a “natural hormone-enhancing muscle builder,” but it contained controlled substances regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration.

“Some people think that as long as a supplement doesn’t contain steroids, it’s OK to take. What they don’t realize is that many supplements contain substances that become steroids in the body. Some contain undeclared steroids. That’s what happened in this particular situation,” said Clark, a registered dietitian and the Nutritional Medicine Flight commander at David Grant USAF Medical Center.

According to Clark, some manufacturers add chemotherapy drugs or other “hidden drugs” to their products, which could show up “positive” in a urinalysis test. Supplements also can have strong effects in the body, she said.

“Some can increase the risk of bleeding. There is also the potential for adverse reactions when supplements are combined with prescription drugs,” said Clark.

About 60 to 70 percent of active duty members and 44 to 53 percent of Department of Defense civilians use at least one dietary supplement per week, according to a 2015 study on self-reported side effects in the armed forces population. About 22 percent of military members reported taking three or more supplements per week while 20 percent of civilians reported taking five or more per week.

The study, published by the National Center for Biotechnology and the National Institute of Health, found that people who used one to two supplements per week were 1.5 times more likely to report abnormal heartbeats. It also found that people using three to four supplements were three times more likely to report abnormal heartbeats than people who didn’t use supplements.

“Other reported side effects common in users were stomach pain, dizziness, tremors, numbness and tingling,” said Clark. “Those side effects appeared particularly often in those using combination supplements – those with several ingredients.”

People take supplements for various reasons but usually because they want to see quick results, said Clark. “They want to get fit, lose weight or improve sexual performance.”

Supplement sales in the United States in 2014 were estimated in excess of $36 billion, including more than $14 billion for supplements containing vitamins and minerals, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

“There’s an assumption that if a supplement is sold in a store, somebody is making sure it’s safe. That’s not the case,” said Clark.

Supplements are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration so they can be sold without being proven safe or effective, she said.

The FDA requires supplement manufacturers to report serious adverse health events, but there is no requirement to report minor adverse issues. In fact, the FDA receives only one in 100 of these reports, according to the Government Accounting Agency.

Although the FDA “will pull a supplement if enough people report side effects or if the drug is not effective,” people don’t often make reports, said Clark.

“They think there’s a benefit from taking it (a supplement) so they don’t want to give that up,” she said.

Clark urges people who use supplements to consult the Operation Supplement Safety website at: http://opss.org.

OPSS is a Department of Defense initiative to educate the military workforce, family members, leaders and health care providers about dietary supplements and how to choose them wisely.

“You can report adverse events on the website, which could alert the FDA that a product may not be safe,” said Clark.

The website also provides a list of “red flag” and high-risk supplements and hosts an “Ask the Expert” forum to address specific concerns. There also is a list of supplement ingredients banned by the FDA.

Additionally, the website provides a link to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. This is normally a subscription-only service, but is free to members using a government computer, said Clark.

People who use supplements should only buy brands that have been verified by a third party such as the United Pharmacopeial Convention, or are manufactured by large, well-known companies. Although this does not guarantee that a supplement will be safe or effective, “it does validate manufacturing practices, purity or quality,” she said.

http://www.travis.af.mil/News/Features/Display/Article/1137087/supplement-may-cost-people-more-than-money/

Jets CB Nick Marshall Suspended 4 Games for Violating NFL PED Policy

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New York Jets cornerback Nick Marshall has been suspended for the first four games of next season after violating the NFL‘s policy on performance-enhancing drugs.

An NFL spokesperson announced Marshall’s suspension, per the Jets’ official website.

After playing quarterback at the University of Auburn, Marshall signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars as an undrafted free agent in 2015.

Marshall moved to cornerback in the NFL, appearing in 13 games as a rookie with the Jaguars. He signed with the Jets last October and played in eight games primarily on special teams where he returned 12 kickoffs and averaged 14 yards per return.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2703732-jets-cb-nick-marshall-suspended-4-games-for-violating-nfl-ped-policy

Redskins’ Trent Murphy suspended four games for violating NFL’s PED policy

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The Redskins‘ first four opponents are unknown at this point, but even without that important piece of information, their opening four-game stretch just got a little bit tougher.

That’s because the NFL suspended linebacker Trent Murphy for four games Friday after he violated the league’s performance-enhancing substances policy. Murphy’s suspension was first reported a month ago by Master Tesfatsion of the Washington Post; that report indicated Murphy was appealing the suspension. So, Murphy appears to have lost that appeal.

He will still be allowed to partake in offseason and preseason activities.

View image on Twitter

A year ago, Murphy recorded a career-high nine sacks and finished as Pro Football Focus’ seventh-most productive pass rusher among all 3-4 outside linebackers. He registered 55 total pressures on 372 pass-rushing snaps. Only Ryan Kerrigan finished with more sacks on the team.

Here’s what I wrote about Murphy when the initial report of his suspension broke:

His production was particularly impressive given what happened before the season. As Tesfatsion explained his story, Washington wanted Murphy to make the switch from linebacker to defensive end last offseason, so Murphy packed on 30 pounds to fit the part. But when Junior Galette lost his season to an injury suffered in late July, Murphy switched back to outside linebacker, which means he had to lose the 30 pounds he had already gained. Despite the tough circumstances, Murphy finished second on the team in sacks.

It was Murphy’s breakout season, as the former second-round pick struggled in his first two seasons, accumulating a total of just six sacks. Really, Murphy’s strongest attribute before his breakout was his durability, as he missed just one game in his career.

The four-game suspension pretty much renders that aspect of his game useless.

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/redskins-trent-murphy-suspended-four-games-for-violating-nfls-ped-policy/

Maria Sharapova Had To Google The Drug She Was Taking

See, Maria Sharapova is not that different from you. (Well, except maybe for a few things such as her over $285 million in tennis earnings.) The tennis star recently said that she didn’t know what meldonium was until testing positive in January 2016 at the Australian Open for the recently banned substance. As the 29-year-old (soon to be 30 this month) five-time Grand Slam champion told the Times of London, “I had to Google it to find out. To me, it was Mildronate.” Mildronate is the trade name for meldonium, which the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) placed on its banned substance list on September 16, 2015, effective January 1 , 2016, after finding that the drug could potentially increase exercise capacity and tolerance. Since mildronate, meldonium or whatever you want to call it isn’t commonly used in the U.S., you probably had to Google it as well.

This month Sharapova will be back on the professional women’s tennis tour…nine months sooner than initially expected. Originally suspended by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) for two years, the tennis star appealed the ruling, essentially arguing, “WADA you mean that mildronate is on the banned substance list?” Sharapova’s legal team argued that she had used meldonium for magnesium deficiency and a family history of diabetes for nearly a decade and was unaware that the drug had recently been banned. Therefore, as her team asserted, the fault, if any, lay in her team for not reading the latest updated banned substance list. A court of arbitration listened and reduced her suspension to 15 months because it did not find enough evidence that Sharapova was an “intentional doper.”

Sharapova, who’s also known for her grunting on the tennis court, is not exactly returning to the women’s professional tennis tour quietly. She’s returning swinging. She also asked the Times, “Why didn’t someone come up to me and have a private conversation, just an official to an athlete, which would have taken care of the confidentiality problem they talked about later?” Now Sharapova is contending that the ITF should have warned her that WADA would be moving mildronate to the banned list. The ITF countered: WADA you mean, how could they know what drugs Sharapova was taking, as Sky News reports. Meanwhile, players such as Caroline Wozniacki, Angelique Kerber and Andy Murray have questioned why Sharapova is getting special wild card entries into tournaments instead of having to play her way back into getting tournament invitations. Oh, and Sharapova’s dating attempts didn’t go well during her hiatus, because she feels that men are intimidated by her, which is what she told Akshay Kohli for Tennis World.) Ah, Maria is back.

What to make of all this? Well, you can be sure that people in the future will use the “didn’t know” or “didn’t hear” defense when found taking a banned substance, whether the argument is legitimate or not. To guard against such defenses, governing bodies may need to broadcast any list changes more unequivocally on multiple channels (e.g., “doughnuts now #bannedsubstance by @WADA #frownyface”). They may need to make clearer some common alternative names for a banned substance (within reason, of course, since drugs may have many, many different pet names).

At the same time, athletes need to be careful about and keep track of what goes into their bodies. Asking the ITF to monitor what each player on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) tour is taking and then give her a gentle warning about anything possibly suspicious or banned is just not realistic. The WTA includes hundreds of players across numerous countries. Following each closely would be logistically challenging. Your doctor doesn’t even know what you are taking unless you tell him or her. This is especially true for patients taking supplements or other substances offered by alternative health providers that don’t follow Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. Such items may have ingredients and substances that could affect your health without your realizing it. You could be end up regretting not fully knowing or understanding what is going into your body. Thus, at least in this regard, Sharapova is not that different from you.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2017/04/17/maria-sharapova-says-she-had-to-google-the-drug-she-was-taking/#530f5c735a3a

MATT SHOEMAKER JOINS TAYLOR HOOTON FOUNDATION’S ADVISORY BOARD OF MAJOR-LEAGUE PLAYERS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

MATT SHOEMAKER JOINS TAYLOR HOOTON FOUNDATION’S ADVISORY BOARD OF MAJOR-LEAGUE PLAYERS

Angels Pitcher Joins 36 Others in Helping to Educate Young People About the Dangers of Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs

 

McKinney, Texas (Wednesday, April 19, 2017) – The Taylor Hooton Foundation announced today that Matt Shoemaker of the Los Angeles Angels has joined its “Advisory Board” of active players from throughout Major League Baseball. The Taylor Hooton Foundation is widely acknowledged as the leader in the advocacy against appearance and performance enhancing drug use by the youth of America.

The Angels right-hander joins 36 other members of the Hooton Foundation’s “Advisory Board,” which now includes at least one player from 28 of the 30 major-league teams. The two remaining teams are working to secure new members, replacing those who were traded or became free agents in the off-season so that every MLB team will again be represented. Shoemaker replaces C. J. Wilson, who was a charter member of the “Advisory Board,” as the Angels’ representative.

“It is so important that our young people have positive role models to look up to, especially when it comes to the topic of competing in sports and in life by doing things the right way,” said Taylor Hooton Foundation Founder and Executive Chair Don Hooton. “These major league athletes reached the pinnacle of their sport and, combined with our education campaign, are the most effective weapons we have in this national struggle. We are honored to have such a terrific group of major league players working with us.”

As members of the “Advisory Board” – formed in 2014 and fully endorsed by Major League Baseball – the players will participate in the THF’s 2017 public-service campaign, All Me. For the campaign, a print and video PSA featuring each of the Foundation’s “Advisory Board” members will be created – with images provided by THF national partner, Getty Images – and will be made available to each player’s respective team for its program/magazine and video boards for the ‘17 season. In addition, All-Me-themed print PSAs will run in Major League Baseball’s All-Star-Game, League-Championship-Series and World-Series programs.

In addition to their participation in the public-service-ad campaigns since 2015, members of the “Advisory Board” also take part in the THF’s educational activities in their local communities. Board members have also provided their input on the most-effective ways to educate North America’s young people about the dangers of anabolic steroids and other appearance and performance enhancing drugs.

To date, the Taylor Hooton Foundation has spoken to and educated more than one-million people. It has a Latin American outreach and travels throughout the Caribbean, speaking to thousands of RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities) athletes, coaches and parents in partnership with Major League Baseball. Additionally, the THF introduced a new eLearning program in 2014 – narrated by Bob Costas – to Little League Baseball that is offered to its one-million adult coaches and other volunteers.

Members of the Taylor Hooton Foundation’s “Advisory Board” – to date – include:

Elvis Andrus (Texas Rangers)

Jake Arrieta (Chicago Cubs)

Jose Bautista (Toronto Blue Jays)

Charlie Blackmon (Colorado Rockies)

Michael Blazek (Milwaukee Brewers)

Jay Bruce (New York Mets)

Matt Carpenter (St. Louis Cardinals)

Brian Dozier (Minnesota Twins)

Matt Duffy (Tampa Bay Rays)

Adam Duvall (Cincinnati Reds)

Logan Forsythe (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Brett Gardner (New York Yankees)

Dillon Gee (Texas Rangers)

Ken Giles (Houston Astros)

Alex Gordon (Kansas City Royals)

J.J. Hardy (Baltimore Orioles)

Derek Holland (Chicago White Sox)

Clayton Kershaw (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Dallas Keuchel (Houston Astros)

Jason Kipnis (Cleveland Indians)

Nick Markakis (Atlanta Braves)

James McCann (Detroit Tigers)

Mark Melancon (San Francisco Giants)

Aaron Nola (Philadelphia Phillies)

Joe Panik (San Francisco Giants)

Dustin Pedroia (Boston Red Sox)

Josh Reddick (Houston Astros)

Anthony Rendon (Washington Nationals)

Clayton Richard (San Diego Padres)

Tyson Ross (Texas Rangers)

Chris Sale (Boston Red Sox)

Marcus Semien (Oakland Athletics)

Matt Shoemaker (Los Angeles Angels)

Neil Walker (New York Mets)

Christian Yelich (Miami Marlins)

Brad Ziegler (Miami Marlins)

Mike Zunino (Seattle Mariners)

 

 About The Taylor Hooton Foundation: The Taylor Hooton Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit organization that is dedicated to educating North America’s young people about the dangers of anabolic steroids and other appearance and performance enhancing drugs.   The friends and family of Taylor Hooton formed the Foundation in 2004 after his untimely death at 17 years old following his use of anabolic steroids.

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Dietary Supplements and Cancer Treatment: A Risky Mixture

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Patients undergoing cancer treatment often experience not only pain and discomfort from their disease, but also the potentially debilitating side effects caused by their treatments.

Some patients who do not receive adequate palliative care to lessen these side effects, or those driven to do anything possible to feel better while fighting their disease, may turn to dietary supplements advertised as having anticancer effects or being supportive of general health, frequently without consulting a health care professional.

Some herbal medicines and dietary supplements have negative interactions with prescribed cancer treatments.

Some herbal medicines and dietary supplements have negative interactions with prescribed cancer treatments.

These supplements are often herbs or other natural products. “A common, false belief is that ‘if it’s natural, it must be safe,’” said Dr. Barrie Cassileth, chief of the Integrative Medicine Service at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. “But herbs and other dietary supplements are biologically active compounds, and they frequently have negative interactions with prescription pharmaceuticals.”

Furthermore, as a growing number of studies have shown, commonly used herbs and supplements can interact with cancer chemotherapy or radiation therapy, causing potentially life-threatening effects.

Widespread Use

In a systematic review published by Dr. Cassileth and a colleague in 1998, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by cancer patients, including herbs and other dietary supplements, ranged from 7 percent to 64 percent in 21 different studies, with the average being about 31 percent.

CAM use has most likely increased during the past 11 years. In a 2004 study from the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, more than 80 percent of patients enrolled in early phase chemotherapy trials concurrently used supplemental vitamins, herbs, or minerals, which were often explicitly not allowed as part of the trial protocols.

A study from a Midwestern oncology clinic published in 2005 showed that 65 percent of patients receiving chemotherapy had also taken dietary supplements, not including vitamins. Twenty-five percent of these had used one or more herbal therapies that are thought to have negative interactions with chemotherapy drugs. The majority of the patients did not consult a health care professional prior to supplement use.

Dangerous Interactions

“We tell patients that if you are on any chemotherapy or undergoing radiation, or planning for it in the future: no herbs, no antioxidants, no dietary supplements, across the board. Particularly herbal agents, because they can interact with and decrease the level of chemotherapy or any medication that enters your body,” explained Dr. Cassileth.

These effects are due to pharmacokinetic interactions—what happens when biologically active compounds in an herb alter the way a chemotherapy drug is absorbed, distributed in the body, metabolized, or eliminated. These interactions can happen for many reasons, including interference with the enzymes in the liver that normally break down the drugs, or interactions with the transporters that carry drugs across cell membranes. St. John’s Wort, garlic extract, and Echinacea are examples of commonly used herbal products thought to pharmacokinetically interact with chemotherapy drugs.

Pharmacokinetic interactions can have two potentially disastrous consequences. One is that less chemotherapy drug circulates in the bloodstream than is needed, leading to treatment failure. The other is the opposite effect: if the chemotherapy drugs are not broken down and removed from the body as expected, severe side effects can occur as a result of an overdose.

Unwanted Protection for Cancer Cells

Even antioxidant supplements such as vitamin E have the potential to interfere with treatment. Radiation therapy and some types of chemotherapy work by generating free radicals that damage cells’ DNA. Antioxidants can block this therapeutic effect.

“People are taking high-dose antioxidant supplements thinking they’re only going to protect normal cells, but both preclinical and clinical data show that they may protect both normal and tumor cells,” explained Dr. Brian Lawenda, a radiation oncologist from the Naval Medical Center in San Diego.

In 2008, Dr. Lawenda and his colleagues performed a review of results from the published randomized clinical trials testing antioxidants with radiation therapy or chemotherapy, and they concluded that the use of high doses of “supplemental antioxidants during chemotherapy and radiation therapy should be discouraged because of the possibility of tumor protection and reduced survival.”

A Silver Lining?

Even though doctors now caution patients not to mix and match over-the-counter supplements with cancer treatment, the bioactivity of herbs and other natural products are of interest to some cancer researchers looking for ways to enhance chemotherapy. While many herbs have been shown to interfere with chemotherapy, some may actually improve its efficacy.

“The interaction between certain complementary approaches and conventional treatment is an area of special interest to the Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM),” said Dr. Jeffrey White, director of OCCAM. “We’re looking for ways to use natural products to improve the therapeutic index of conventional therapy.”

In addition to supporting ongoing clinical trials testing several traditional Chinese medicines in combination with the chemotherapy drugs irinotecan, capecitabine, and gemcitabine, OCCAM released two program announcements (PA-09-167 and PA-09-168) that will provide funding for researchers interested in testing synergistic interactions between natural products and traditional therapies

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/research/dietary-supplements